Week in Review: July 3-9

There were some interesting news pieces this week. I’m particularly on the lookout for stories on that topic, since I will be giving a talk on race, disability, and health next month. If you see anything, please send it my way. Also, for those of you in the northeast, don’t forget about the First Annual Disability Pride Parade in New York on Sunday!

Without further ado, here is my curated list of disability news highlights from the past week:

Motherhood

A Kindergarten Form Asks: Vaginal Birth or C-Section. Why?” (Cara Paiuk): I absolutely loved this piece – a rant, in many ways – in which Paiuk recalls her dismay at a kindergarten registration form that asked whether her child was delivered vaginally or via c-section. This, to me, is the perfect convergence of pop disability diagnostics and mother-blaming: the absurd notion that school nurses or other officials might link a child’s deliver, five years earlier, to certain traits or tendencies in the first year of grade school. Unbelievable. And scary that no other parents at the school raised any questions about this false connection.

Vaccines

California, Camelot and Vaccines” (Frank Bruni): Bruni shares a curious history of communications with Robert Kennedy Jr, environmentalist and dangerously powerful voice against vaccination. My favorite quote from the piece: “Although the Internet could be making all of us smarter, it makes many of us stupider, because it’s not just a magnet for the curious. It’s a sinkhole for the gullible.”

The Challenge of Public Dissemination” (EJ Sobo). A medical anthropologist thinks through her recent experience of having her research on vaccination beliefs and practices picked up – and then misinterpreted – by the popular press. A great look at anthropology for multiple audiences and the shifting nature of dissemination in a digital age.

Race and Disability

Without Addressing Disability We’ll Never Make Meaningful Progress in Ending Police Violence” (Milwaukee Community Journal). An important piece about disability and intersectionality, a topic I’m seeing more and more.

The Racial Imbalances of Special Education” (Weston Phippen): Experts speak out against recent study arguing that Black and Latino students are not overrepresented in special ed, contrary to widespread belief. Curiously, the social and cultural dimensions of (over)diagnosis don’t make it into the piece until almost the end.

NYPD Officers Accused of Beating Teen with Autism Assumed He Was ‘Up to No Good’: Lawyer” (Andres Jauregui). A Black teen with autism was allegedly beaten by police for no reason in front of his home last fall. New York’s finest are at it again.

Misc.

Of all U.S. Police Shootings, One-Quarter Reportedly Involve the Mentally Ill” (NPR). The headline says it all

Disability, Anthropology, and a Sister’s Ambivalence” (Liz Lewis). My recent blog piece on my ambivalent relationship with disability, both as a concept and also a central aspect of my family’s autobiography. I hesitated to write this and to put it out there, but it has touched a nerve with many readers.

Celebrating 25 Years of the ADA” (Alan E. Guttmacher). 25 years and going, but we still have much to do!

Disability Fieldnotes Week in Review: June 26-July 2

Here is a curated collection of last week’s disability news. Enjoy!

History:

“Laura’s World” (Louis Menand)
New Yorker feature story on Laura Bridgman, the first deafblind child to receive a proper education in the U.S. Bridgman’s deafblindness was the result of scarlet fever as a young child, and she went on to study at Perkins School for the Blind, where my younger sister went to school as a teenager. For a fictionalized account of Bridgman’s life, read Kimberly Elkins’ What Is Visible

Disability, Law, and Society:

“Why French Kids Don’t Have ADHD” (Marilyn Wedge)
Interesting piece on the the cultural facets of this common diagnosis. While I cannot comment on the science behind it, I do believe it’s important to question contemporary understandings of “disorder” and even “diagnosis.” I’m curious to read more from this author. Continue reading

Disability Fieldnotes Week in Review: June 19-25

Here are some of the disability news features that I found most interesting from the past week. Please send other suggestions my way!

Disability and Race
Claim: Minorities Underrepresented in Special Education” (Michelle Diamond)
More Minority Students Should be in Special Ed, Study Says” (Joy Resmovits)
Minorities are Disproportionately Underrepresented in Special Education: Longitudinal Evidence Across Five Disability Conditions” (Paul L. Morgan et. al)
This study, published in Educational Researcher and then featured on Disability Scoop, examines the common assumption that children of color are overrepresented in U.S. special education programs. Surprisingly, the authors found the contrary to be true. I would love to hear more on this topic, as there remains much work to be done on the intersections of disability and race.

Disability Rights
Sowing New Needs in the Garden of Disability Rights Activism” (Emily Ladau)

Economic Well-Being
The IRS released guidelines for the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, which can be found here.

Health
No Link Between C-Sections and Autism, Study Says” (Catherine Pearson)
California Law to Curtail Vaccine Exemptions Clears Hurdle” (Rebecca Plevin)
California Lawmakers Vote to Remove Vaccine Exemptions for Schoolchildren” (Scott Neuman)
California Passes Bill to Require Vaccines and Ban Religious Exemptions” (Anna Diamond)

Week In Review: June 13-18

Week in Review is back! Disability Fieldnotes, too. What can I say? I’ve been busy.

This was a particularly jam-packed week in disability news and events, thanks in part to last weekend’s incredible Society for Disability Studies conference in Atlanta, which I was incredibly fortunate to attend. I’m still reeling from the experience – in a good way, that is – and am working on a few blog posts, so keep an eye out. For now, however, the news.

Mental Illness
It’s Not About Mental Illness: The Big Lie That Always Follows Mass Shootings by White Males” (Arthur Chu)
As an anthropologist and disability scholar, I am fascinated by tendency to explain despicable acts of violence by white perpetrators in terms of mental illness. A great read.

Society for Disability Studies Conference
This conference blew me away. Did you miss it? Nah, you just think you did. You can read live tweets from the incredible Digital Access Facilitation Team (DAFT, of which I was a part) at #2015SDS.  DAFT mastermind Adam Newman is in the process of archiving the Twitter coverage on Storify, so stay tuned for that. An incredible digital access initiative.

Disability Rights
For Individuals With Disabilities, There’s No Place(Ment) Like Home” (Michaela Connery)
A piece on the crisis of disability housing in the U.S. Keep an eye out for more from this author.

Education
New Federal Report Explores Ways to Break the School to Prison Pipeline for Students with Disabilities” (National Council on Disability)
U.S. Schools Must Stop Excluding Children with Disabilities” (David M. Perry)

News
When it comes to the case of Gypsy Rose Blancharde, the supposedly-disabled-but-not young woman who recently murdered her mother, I am biased. First, I’m writing a piece on disability and mother-blaming, so I’m familiar with Munchausen by Proxy, a condition with which mothers literally create illness or disability in their children. It’s an accusation sometimes leveled at moms whose children’s disabilities and medical conditions cannot be explained, and it first made the ranks of the DSM in 2013. Part of my fascination with Munchausen is that it illustrates that – contrary to some well-known anthropological beliefs – we do not, in fact, have to look to other cultural frameworks to find exceptions to the supposedly innate nature of mother love.

In addition to my interest in Munchausen, I’m also from Springfield, MO, the Ozarks’ city closest to the Blanchardes. I’ve always regarded the area as a hotbed for truly bizarre, NCIS-style crimes, and this fights right in. I will be writing more on this next week. For now, here is some coverage from a few of my hometown news outlets:

Was Gypsy Blancharde a Victim of Munchausen by Proxy” (Stephen Herzog)
“Newspaper Report Shows Blanchardes Were Claiming Medical Issues in 2001” (Gene Hartley)
Around the Web: Notable Coverage of Blancharde Case” (Thomas Gounley)

Disability Fieldnotes Digest: Jan 24-29

Politics and Current Events

Disability Advocates Fight Disabled Governor” (NPR’s Here and Now)

Austin-based disability rights activist Bob Kafka reflects on Governor Greg Abbott, the first U.S. governor since George Wallace to use a wheelchair in office.

Execution of Warren Hill ‘Shakes the Foundation of our Legal System for People with Intellectual Disabilities” (The Arc)

On January 27, the state of Georgia executed Warren Hill, a convicted murderer known to have a lifelong intellectual disability. Despite past Supreme Court rulings that the death penalty is unlawful for individuals with intellectual disabilities, only Justices Sotomayor and Breyer voted for a stay of execution. This is truly a shocking story. Continue reading

Disability Fieldnotes: January 17-23

Your weekly dose of disability news coverage, commentary and debates.  Enjoy!

Disability and Health Disparities

Hypertension More Prevalent in Individuals with IDD” (The Arc)

Race and Health Disparities in Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Living in the United States,” Haleigh M. Scott and Susan M. Havercamp (Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities)

Vaccines and Infectious Disease

When Measles Spreads From Disneyland, It’s a Small World After All,” by Rachel Rabkin Peachman (NYT Motherlode) Continue reading

Disability Fieldnotes Weekly: Jan. 10-16

Second installment of Disability Fieldnotes, my weekly curated digest of disability in the news. Subscribe here!

Family

Harsh Critics in Public Spaces, Judging Only What They See” David M. Perry (NYT)

Gender, Parenting, and Public Shame” David M. Perry (companion to NYT piece, published on Perry’s blog)

Remembering a ‘Giant’: Everything We Did, We Did Together” (NPR) 

Diagnostic Understandings

When ADHD Isn’t What it Seems” Olga Khazan (Atlantic Monthly)

Society and Culture

Four Disability Euphemisms that Need to Bite the Dust” Emily Ladau (Center for Disability Rights, Inc.)

RJ Mitte: Nothing I Do Will Ever Compare with Breaking Bad” by Homa Khaleeli (The Guardian)

“We Wouldn’t Accept Actors Blacking Up, So Why Applaud ‘Cripping Up’?” Frances Ryan (The Guardian)

HBO to Air Autism Documentary” Michelle DIament (Disability Scoop)

Politics

Rand Paul: Disability Insurance Wasted on People with Anxiety and Back Pain” (Huffington Post)

’Death With Dignity’ Laws are Proposed, Bringing National Debate to D.C. and MD” Mike DeBonis (Washington Post)

Media Advisory: Disability Advocates Prepared to Oppose Flurry of State Assisted Suicide Bills Being Introduced in 2015” (PR Web)

 

Disability Fieldnotes: Jan. 3-9

In case you missed it…announcing the Disability Fieldnotes weekly feature!  Sign up here to receive an email each Friday with a short list of the disability-related news stories that I found most captivating, curious, or controversial from that week.  As with content I post on Twitter, retweets ≠ endorsements.  I do not necessarily agree with the articles included in Disability Fieldnotes.  I do, however, think that they are important.

Whether your connection to disability is academic, personal, or professional, I hope that Disability Fieldnotes will be a fantastic resource.  Weekly news highlights will include such diverse themes as genetics, bioethics, caregiving, special events, policy, and cutting-edge research.  Read the stories right away or file them for later perusal.  Share them with colleagues and friends, cite them in your research, mention them in meetings and presentations.  Just use them.  Spread the word, raise awareness, and help promote increased knowledge and understanding of disability issues in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Questions or suggestions?  Drop me a line at emlewis [at] gmail [dot] com.  Looking for a more extensive list of disability news?  Then check out my Twitter feed (@lizlewisanthro), which I use as a continuously updating archive of disability stories in the media.

Here is the first weekly installment of this curated news series.  Enjoy and please share widely!

Vaccines
​”Measles Makes an Unwelcome Visit to Disneyland” (NPR)
“Anti-Vaxxers are Idolizing the Amish, Inexplicably” (Atlantic Monthly)
“U.S. Court Upholds NY State Vaccination Requirement for Students” (Reuters)

Caregiving and Parenting
“‘Home is a Medicine Unto Itself'” (Atlantic Monthly)
“Parenting on the Dark Side” (NYT)

Autism
“My Son is Black and has Autism, and I’m Terrified” (Today.com)
“Parents of Autistic Children Say Shooting Hits Home” (KVUE.com)
“Family Remembers Man Killed by Homeowner as ‘Gentle Giant'” (KXAN.com)
“CDC Stepping Up Autism Monitoring Efforts” (Disability Scoop)
“Recalling Blind Tom: An Autistic Pianist Born to Slavery” (NYT)

Pop Culture
“Mat Fraser: ‘Someone Had the Balls to Make a Drama Starring Freaks'” (The Guardian)
“The New Abnormal: The Carnival Logic of American Horror Story” (New Yorker – from December, but a good read)

Announcing Disability Fieldnotes Digest!

I’m thrilled to announce a new feature for Disability Fieldnotes highlighting each week’s most interesting, important, or perhaps controversial disability-related news stories.  Subscribers will receive a single email (no more, no less!) each week containing links to these curated stories, picked from my otherwise endless search for disability in the media. The Disability Fieldnotes digest will be an excellent way to catch up on a small number of stories you might have missed, to stay abreast of pressing issues and upcoming events, and (for the researchers out there) to maintain an ongoing record of relevant news throughout the year.

Subscribe here!

Update: StoryCorps/Disability Visibility Project!

Would you believe that the slots for StoryCorps interviews were filled in three minutes during last month’s registration?  Wow!

Here’s so good news: due to unambiguous demand, StoryCorps has opened up additional interview times.  People can sign up here Wednesday, January 7th at 10:00 a.m. Be warned, however, that these will likely go just as quickly as last time.

If you live in the Austin area and have a disability story to tell, please consider signing up!