Week In Review: June 13-18

Week in Review is back! Disability Fieldnotes, too. What can I say? I’ve been busy.

This was a particularly jam-packed week in disability news and events, thanks in part to last weekend’s incredible Society for Disability Studies conference in Atlanta, which I was incredibly fortunate to attend. I’m still reeling from the experience – in a good way, that is – and am working on a few blog posts, so keep an eye out. For now, however, the news.

Mental Illness
It’s Not About Mental Illness: The Big Lie That Always Follows Mass Shootings by White Males” (Arthur Chu)
As an anthropologist and disability scholar, I am fascinated by tendency to explain despicable acts of violence by white perpetrators in terms of mental illness. A great read.

Society for Disability Studies Conference
This conference blew me away. Did you miss it? Nah, you just think you did. You can read live tweets from the incredible Digital Access Facilitation Team (DAFT, of which I was a part) at #2015SDS.  DAFT mastermind Adam Newman is in the process of archiving the Twitter coverage on Storify, so stay tuned for that. An incredible digital access initiative.

Disability Rights
For Individuals With Disabilities, There’s No Place(Ment) Like Home” (Michaela Connery)
A piece on the crisis of disability housing in the U.S. Keep an eye out for more from this author.

Education
New Federal Report Explores Ways to Break the School to Prison Pipeline for Students with Disabilities” (National Council on Disability)
U.S. Schools Must Stop Excluding Children with Disabilities” (David M. Perry)

News
When it comes to the case of Gypsy Rose Blancharde, the supposedly-disabled-but-not young woman who recently murdered her mother, I am biased. First, I’m writing a piece on disability and mother-blaming, so I’m familiar with Munchausen by Proxy, a condition with which mothers literally create illness or disability in their children. It’s an accusation sometimes leveled at moms whose children’s disabilities and medical conditions cannot be explained, and it first made the ranks of the DSM in 2013. Part of my fascination with Munchausen is that it illustrates that – contrary to some well-known anthropological beliefs – we do not, in fact, have to look to other cultural frameworks to find exceptions to the supposedly innate nature of mother love.

In addition to my interest in Munchausen, I’m also from Springfield, MO, the Ozarks’ city closest to the Blanchardes. I’ve always regarded the area as a hotbed for truly bizarre, NCIS-style crimes, and this fights right in. I will be writing more on this next week. For now, here is some coverage from a few of my hometown news outlets:

Was Gypsy Blancharde a Victim of Munchausen by Proxy” (Stephen Herzog)
“Newspaper Report Shows Blanchardes Were Claiming Medical Issues in 2001” (Gene Hartley)
Around the Web: Notable Coverage of Blancharde Case” (Thomas Gounley)