Week In Review: June 13-18

Week in Review is back! Disability Fieldnotes, too. What can I say? I’ve been busy.

This was a particularly jam-packed week in disability news and events, thanks in part to last weekend’s incredible Society for Disability Studies conference in Atlanta, which I was incredibly fortunate to attend. I’m still reeling from the experience – in a good way, that is – and am working on a few blog posts, so keep an eye out. For now, however, the news.

Mental Illness
It’s Not About Mental Illness: The Big Lie That Always Follows Mass Shootings by White Males” (Arthur Chu)
As an anthropologist and disability scholar, I am fascinated by tendency to explain despicable acts of violence by white perpetrators in terms of mental illness. A great read.

Society for Disability Studies Conference
This conference blew me away. Did you miss it? Nah, you just think you did. You can read live tweets from the incredible Digital Access Facilitation Team (DAFT, of which I was a part) at #2015SDS.  DAFT mastermind Adam Newman is in the process of archiving the Twitter coverage on Storify, so stay tuned for that. An incredible digital access initiative.

Disability Rights
For Individuals With Disabilities, There’s No Place(Ment) Like Home” (Michaela Connery)
A piece on the crisis of disability housing in the U.S. Keep an eye out for more from this author.

Education
New Federal Report Explores Ways to Break the School to Prison Pipeline for Students with Disabilities” (National Council on Disability)
U.S. Schools Must Stop Excluding Children with Disabilities” (David M. Perry)

News
When it comes to the case of Gypsy Rose Blancharde, the supposedly-disabled-but-not young woman who recently murdered her mother, I am biased. First, I’m writing a piece on disability and mother-blaming, so I’m familiar with Munchausen by Proxy, a condition with which mothers literally create illness or disability in their children. It’s an accusation sometimes leveled at moms whose children’s disabilities and medical conditions cannot be explained, and it first made the ranks of the DSM in 2013. Part of my fascination with Munchausen is that it illustrates that – contrary to some well-known anthropological beliefs – we do not, in fact, have to look to other cultural frameworks to find exceptions to the supposedly innate nature of mother love.

In addition to my interest in Munchausen, I’m also from Springfield, MO, the Ozarks’ city closest to the Blanchardes. I’ve always regarded the area as a hotbed for truly bizarre, NCIS-style crimes, and this fights right in. I will be writing more on this next week. For now, here is some coverage from a few of my hometown news outlets:

Was Gypsy Blancharde a Victim of Munchausen by Proxy” (Stephen Herzog)
“Newspaper Report Shows Blanchardes Were Claiming Medical Issues in 2001” (Gene Hartley)
Around the Web: Notable Coverage of Blancharde Case” (Thomas Gounley)

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Week in Review: September 7-14

Vaccinations
PBS series Nova aired an excellent one-hour piece, “Vaccines – Calling the Shots,” which can be streamed online.  It offers a general look at the history of recent vaccine debates in the U.S., with a special eye toward the troublesome resurgence of preventable disease outbreaks.  You can read reviews of “Calling the Shots” here and here.  This 2009 Wired article and this interview with anthropologist Sharon Kaufman offer some additional background on contemporary conspiracy theories and folk beliefs regarding vaccines today.

Politics
Texas state senator and gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis shares her own history with abortion in her new memoir, Forgetting to be Afraid.  While it seems absurd to discuss her termination of an ectopic pregnancy in terms of abortion, Davis also reveals that she aborted a pregnancy after multiple physicians agreed that the baby would be born with disabilities if it even survived the pregnancy.  There is a lot to unpack in this story, particular in terms of the mainstream media’s lack of interest in probing the tensions between disability rights and women’s reproductive rights.  You can read more here and here.

Public Health
The Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues to spread unabated amidst growing international concern.  The BBC has a useful collection of relevant news updates and the New York Times featured an op-ed on Sunday criticizing the international community for it’s “feeble” response to the epidemic.  Current tallies indicate around 4,200 total infections with a continued mortality rate of approximately 50 percent, although it is likely that the numbers are somewhat greater.  For an anthropological take on media coverage of this outbreak, please read my recent piece “From Ebola to Pertussis: A Look at Medical Conspiracy Theories.”

More News
South African sprinter and double amputee Oscar Pistorius was found guilty of culpable homicide for shooting and killing his girlfriend in 2013.  Despite the verdict, Pistorius will still be able to represent his country in international competitions.

Events
Readers might want to have the following upcoming conferences on their radars:

American University Centers of Disability – “The Power of Engagement,” 2014 Conference, Washington, DC, November 9-12

American Anthropological Association – “Producing Anthropology,” 2014 Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, December 3-7

Society for Disability Studies – 2015 Annual Conference, Atlanta, June 10-13 (CFP will be posted October 1st!)

Addressing Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities

I am excited to announce my recent piece for Somatosphere.net, “Addressing Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities: A Conference Report.”

The piece offers a close snapshot of an important conference held at the University of Texas in the fall, which brought together interdisciplinary experts from across North America to discuss future possibilities for social medicine.  It was one of the most intellectually stimulating events I have attended, and it became an important jumping off point for new areas of my own research.

The list of speakers included Dorothy Roberts, Lance Gravlee, Jonathan Metzl, Helena Hansen, and many others.  Several UT faculty with whom I work participated in the working groups on the second day of the event, which offered a collaborative space to brainstorm the role of transdisciplinary efforts in medical education and practice.

I would encourage anyone who is interested in issues of race and/or health to read this piece and learn more about the conference participants.  Please keep any eye out for my companion piece on the need for research on the intersections of race, disability, and health, which is a markedly understudied area.