Siblings and Disability – Part II

This is the second installment in a two-part series about siblings and disability. The first part can be found here.

What does Disability Mean for Typical Siblings?
First things first, I want to be very clear about one thing: existing research does not support the widespread assumption that having a brother or sister with disabilities leads to negative outcomes for the typical sibling or that it is an inherently negative experience. It simply does not support this claim. More to the point, the literature indicates that, as a group, siblings cannot be distinguished from their peers. (See this piece for more.) Moreover, one finds no causal link between disability and negative outcomes for siblings. This is critical.

Perhaps a more interesting question is this: why do some siblings have negative experiences a while others do not? What is the role of disability here? What might this teach us about facilitating positive sibling experiences with disability? How might this enrich understandings, both scholarly and applied, about families and disability?

Disability, Behaviors, and Sibling Experience
It is important to note that research indicates a possible link between negative sibling experiences and the presence of behavioral challenges in the brother or sister with disabilities. Sadly, based on my personal experience I can say – anecdotally – that this resonates. My sister’s disabilities became a much bigger challenge for me once she became self-abusive. It was difficult to take her to many public places, as she was prone to throwing herself onto the ground, banging her head, and getting into an emotional and bodily space that was difficult to break.

While I was never overly concerned by the responses of strangers, I simply did not feel comfortable showing letting most of my friends see this. It was too unsettling and, to be honest, violent. Did this place additional strains on me as a sibling, particularly as I moved through the social mazes of high school? Absolutely. By the end of high school, I essentially did not let anyone in the door if Katie was awake. This is tragic and should never have had to happen. Did it have a lasting impact on me? Nah. But if I could do it over again I would make sure that my childhood friends had maintained their relationships with my whole family as we got older. With supports, knowledge, and communication, I believe that our isolation could have been mitigated.

Moving Forward: Key Points Regarding Siblings and Disability
Ultimately, what do we know about the brothers and sisters of people with disabilities? Not enough. But there are some positive glimmers. In a nutshell, here’s what I would say:

First, disability must not be mistaken for the primary determinant of a sibling’s well-being. Families are complex, as are individuals of all ages. We have the right to this complexity in all of its messiness, quirks, strengths, weaknesses, successes, failures, difficult spells, mistakes, and chance. It is a fallacy to explain a particular trait or tendency in terms of having a sibling with disabilities. This has been used all too often as a scapegoat and, frankly, I’m tired of it.

Second, more studies need to focus on – or, at least, include – siblings. That’s it. We need to know more.

Third, research must account for the diversity of family types and individual experiences. We need to unpack big, scary categories like race, ethnicity, and class. These are all too often ignored or glossed over in disability research in general, which I see as a massive problem. Our work must reflect our world. As a researcher and a sister, I have to stress the diversity of both family setups and sibling relationships. These are not monolithic categories, which makes (or should make) it difficult to generalize. For instance, my experience was shaped significantly by the fact that my sister is my only sibling. Also, we were four years apart. Someone with a sibling 10 years younger would likely have a different dynamic.

Four, just like parents, siblings deserve access to a community of peers. We must not be isolated. Family disability organizations need to prioritize sibling programs – not just once a year at the retreat, but as a regular and ongoing feature.

Five, siblings need self-determinism and independence. We need to be able to speak for ourselves in the literature, rather than continue to be told how we should think/feel/act. We need to muddy the waters and break out of the biases that continue to skew assumptions of what it means to have a brother or sister with disabilities.

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