10 Things You Should Know About Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities

This is a follow-up to my previous post regarding the intersections of disability, race, and health outcomes in the U.S.  It is a shameful truth that the health experiences of Americans with and without disabilities reflect the continued role of inequality, marginalization, and racism in our society today.  Although racial categories exist within and reflect certain common sense understandings of identity, it is critical to note that these are not biological categories.  Race unfolds differently in different spaces, eras, and cultures; it is social in nature, history, and power.  The affects are exacerbated for people of color who also have disabilities, due to the intersectionality of race and disability.  In order to understand the health challenges facing this often overlooked population, it is important to first contextualize the impact of race on Americans’ health. Unless otherwise noted, the statistics below are from the Office of Minority Health.

  • The infant mortality rate for African American babies is double that for Whites.
  • Over 80% of children born with HIV are minorities.
  • The rate of HIV/AIDS infection for Black women is 20 times that for White women
  • African American men are twice as likely to die from prostate cancer than their White peers.
  • Black women are three-to-six times as likely to die resulting from pregnancy complications than their White peers. (See ACOG for more on women’s health.)
  • Black women are diagnosed with breast cancer 10% less often than White women, yet are 40% more likely to die from it.
  • Hispanic women are two times as likely as non-Hispanic White women to die from cervical cancer.
  • Minorities comprise over half of organ donor waiting lists, yet account for only about one-third of organ transplants.
  • Although only 6% of African Americans have heart disease, they are 30% more likely to die from heart disease than their White peers.
  • White men live over four years longer than their Black peers, and Black women die approximately three years earlier than White women.

To illustrate these points, here are some particularly striking graphics:Life Expectancy by Race (U.S., 1970-2010)

Infant Mortality by Maternal RaceLife Expectancy at Birth by Race and Sex (U.S., 2010)Racial Disparities in Birth Outcomes

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